Posts Tagged ‘transgender’

How Grantland Helped Push a Transgender Woman Over the Edge

January 23, 2014 By Guest Contributor

transgolfBy Julian Cabrera and Josh Steichmann

A week ago, Grantland, a sports and culture website run by Bill Simmons, published a story by Caleb Hannan about a purportedly revolutionary putter invented by Dr. Essay Anne Vanderbilt, but Hannan was more fascinated with unraveling Vanderbilt’s mysterious personal life than her clubs.

He dug into her background, which she claimed was MIT physics with a dollop of top secret government work, but Dr. V got cagey, then angry. She pleaded and threatened, but Hannan kept going.

“The deeper I looked, the stranger things got,” Hannan wrote. And after tantalizing hints and incredulous foreshadowing, Hannan outed Dr. V as a transgender woman.

The story got stranger, and darker. Hannan learned that Dr. V had attempted suicide before, and her correspondence grew even more erratic. A few weeks after she last emailed Hannan, telling him he was committing a hate crime, Dr. V killed herself. Hannan describes Dr. V’s brother-in-law giving a brusque and cruel report of her death, then blithely wonders what it means about himself.

The backlash started nearly immediately, with Grantland editor-in-chief Bill Simmons writing a broad apology. In it, he acknowledged that Grantland and Hannan had made grievous mistakes.

“Caleb’s biggest mistake? Outing Dr. V to one of her investors while she was still alive. I don’t think he understood the moral consequences of that decision, and frankly, neither did anyone working for Grantland,” wrote Simmons.

“I didn’t know nearly enough about the transgender community — and neither does my staff,” Simmons wrote. “That’s not an acceptable excuse; it’s just what happened…We’re never taking the Dr. V piece down from Grantland partly because we want people to learn from our experience.”

Christina Kahrl, a transgender woman and baseball writer, wrote a blistering guest piece on Hannan’s article and Grantland’s carelessness.

“By any professional or ethical standard … it wasn’t [Hannan’s] information to share,” Kahrl wrote. “[He] really should have simply stuck with debunking those claims to education and professional expertise relevant to the putter itself, [and] dropped the element of her gender identity if she didn’t want that to be public information — as she very clearly did not.”

Kahrl also pointed out that the piece, aimed towards “mostly white, mostly older, mostly male audience,” did nothing but “reinforce several negative stereotypes about trans people.” And more than that, Kahrl also gave important historical context — up until fairly recently, transgender people were advised to adopt “deep stealth,” and completely abandon their previous lives in order to transition to their authentic gender identity.

“Stealth is tough to maintain, and generally involves trading one closet for another: You may be acting on your sense of self to finally achieve happiness, but the specter of potential discovery is still with you. And if you wind up in the public eye for any reason, stealth might be that much more difficult to maintain,” wrote Kahrl.

A story originally meant to be about a discovery that could have changed the world of golf unfortunately devolved into blind, unthinking privilege, and may have cost a woman her life.

More reactions: Shakesville: Careless, Cruel and Unaccountable.

Rebecca Schoenkopf: That Grantland Trans* Story.

Cyd Zeigler: How Grantland Failed the Trans Community.

Alyssa Rosenberg: Ten Questions Grantland Should Answer About Dr. V and the Magic Putter.

Paris Lees: Is it OK for a Journalist to Reveal the Birth Gender of a Trans Person?

Josh Levin: Digging Too Deep.

Gov. Brown Signs Law Making Accurate ID Easier for Transgender Californians

October 8, 2013 By Josh Steichmann

ab 1121It just got a little bit easier (and cheaper) for transgender Californians to live authentic lives.

Governor Jerry Brown just signed AB 1121, written by Assemblymember Toni Atkins, which streamlines the process for documentation changes, specifically name and gender changes on ID like driver’s licenses and vital documents like birth certificates. The law was cosponsored by Equality California and the Transgender Law Center.

Up until now, changes to birth certificates required a court hearing, and now California is in line with many other states that only require an administrative action, in this case from the Office of Vital Records. Since the court filing fee is $435, and the courts are already overburdened with actual cases, this is a win-win for transgender Californians and good governance.

The law also changes the requirement of public notice, which for many transgender people requires outing themselves to their entire community, which may not be safe and at the least is an unnecessary hassle.

“One step in enabling transgender people to live authentic lives consistent with their gender identity is to ensure that their names and their official documents are consistent with who they are,” said Atkins. “I am very pleased that the Governor signed my bill to move us forward toward equality and dignity for transgender Californians.”

“Today California made it easier for people who are transgender to live authentic lives by removing unnecessary barriers to name changes and identity documents,” said John O’Connor, EQCA executive director. “This is a common sense solution to ensure that transgender Californians are treated fairly and with respect. We thank Gov. Brown and Assemblymember Atkins for their leadership.”

100 Days Later

October 4, 2013 By Josh Steichmann

100 days from SCOTUS marriage100 days ago, the Supreme Court struck down the central portion of the Defense of Marriage Act, and dismissed the last gasp appeal of the Prop. 8 supporters, returning the freedom to marry to California. Across the country, lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people cheered along with allies who supported the vision of an America where everyone could marry the person that they love.

Since then, we’ve seen a parade of victories at the federal level, from the Department of Homeland Security allowing same-sex spouses full immigration privileges to the IRS issuing new rules to make sure loving same-sex couples are recognized, to the first same-sex weddings on U.S. military bases. We’ve seen big marriage victories in New Mexico and New Jersey, and we’ve seen the roll-out of the biggest advance in LGBT healthcare in our lifetimes with the Affordable Care Act.

Here in California, we’ve seen the federal courts uphold SB 1172, which ended the psychological abuse of LGBT youth by licensed therapists, we’ve seen transgender students win both with the passage and signing of the School Success and Opportunity Act (AB 1266), which ensures that transgender students can participate as their authentic selves in school, and at the Arcadia Unified School District, which settled a lawsuit and implemented policies to ensure transgender equality.  Read the rest of this entry »

Legal Resources for Transgender Students

August 21, 2013 By Shaun Osburn

transstudentTrans Student Equality Resources, a youth-led organization dedicated to improving the educational environment for transgender and gender nonconforming students, has partnered with the It Gets Better Project and Lambda Legal to provide youth with information regarding their legal protections as students.

Visit Lambda Legal’s web resources for more information.

Victory for Arcadia Trans Student!

July 24, 2013 By Josh Steichmann
Photo by Daniel Lin

Photo by Daniel Lin

Arcadia Settles With Transgender Student; To Apply District-Wide Protections For Transgender Students

The Arcadia Unified School District has settled with a transgender boy over the discriminatory treatment he received on a school camping trip (PDF of the settlement here.)

The boy, represented by our friends at the NCLR, won districtwide accommodations for not just himself, but every transgender student in the district. Arcadia USD will now join districts like LAUSD and San Francisco USD in making sure that transgender students aren’t excluded from activities, sports and facilities just because of who they are.

Congressmember Judy Chu, whose district includes Arcadia, said: “Teenage years are hard enough to navigate when the only concerns are making friends and learning the lessons of the day. But those challenges are compounded when a teenager happens to be LGBT, and basic notions of equal treatment are brought into question. The fact that this young man was excluded from using school facilities is regrettable to say the least, but thanks to his decision to act and not accept the circumstances he faced, others will not face the same discrimination.”

The United States investigated this complaint under Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 and Title IV of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.  Both Title IX and Title IV prohibit discrimination against students based on sex.
Under the settlement agreement, the district will:
•         work with a consultant to support and assist the district in creating a safe, nondiscriminatory learning environment for students who are transgender or do not conform to gender stereotypes;
•         amend its policies and procedures to reflect that gender-based discrimination, including discrimination based on a student’s gender identity, transgender status, and nonconformity with gender stereotypes, is a form of discrimination based on sex; and
•         train administrators and faculty on preventing gender-based discrimination and creating a nondiscriminatory school environment for transgender students.

More from LGBT Weekly.

The School Success and Opportunity Act (AB 1266), authored by Tom Ammianno and sponsored by EQCA, NCLR, ACLU of California, the GSA Network and Transgender Law Center, would mean that instead of having to fight each school district in court, all California school districts would have sane, safe policies for ending the exclusion of transgender students. Urge Gov. Brown to sign the School Success and Opportunity Act by filling out our action alert.

Photograph by Daniel Lim